The second issue of Assembly is here!
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Assembly

19 July 2018 | Volume 1, Issue 2
  A note from our editor:
Assembly launched two weeks ago and we are still picking ourselves up off the floor. The response from girls around the world has been AMAZING. Your generation is clearly ready for your voices to be heard — and we can’t wait to share your stories. 

So, let’s dive into our second issue!

This week, Malala interviews journalist Elaine Welteroth about how young women can break into spaces that exclude them and her relationship with social media. Sonia Nasir, a student from Pakistan, writes about going against her parents' wishes to study the subjects she wants. From Rio de Janeiro, Yasmin describes how she is empowering other Afro-Brazilian girls through graffiti. We celebrate the accomplishments of medical physicist and Nobel laureate Rosalyn Yalow — and share a new statistic about the economic benefits of girls’ education.

Keep reading, keep sharing and keep sending us your ideas! I hope to see your name in a future issue of Assembly.
Tess
Watch the Video
Malala asks Elaine Welteroth about finding your voice and her advice for budding journalists. Watch now!
 
 
I wanted to be an accountant — but that meant going against my parents' wishes

In our Pakistani community, girls are forced into futures they didn’t choose.
Sonia Nasir
 
  By Sonia Nasir, age 19
I would not consider myself a rebel. From the day I was born in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in Pakistan, I was quiet and obedient, never creating mischief. I always did what was expected — I studied at the top schools, earned high marks. My parents were told it was a “treat” to have a daughter like me. I was on the right track.

Then it came time to choose my career, or, more specifically, time for my family to choose my career. They wanted me to practise medicine, a well-respected profession in our country. People only remember those who are doctors, no other job is regarded. But this was not my passion. I could never see myself being a doctor when I loved math.

Yet, I struggled to go against my parents’ wishes. How could my role models — who had always encouraged my imagination and taught me to be ambitious — suddenly be so limiting?

Read more.
 
 
Sound Off
 
 
Yasmin
“When girls see art in the street done by black women, they will see we are making it a place for them too.”
— Yasmin, age 20, Brazil
Yasmin is using graffiti to empower other Afro-Brazilian girls in Rio de Janeiro who face racism, sexism and gender-based violence. Read more.
 
 
Did You Know?
Animation
 
 
This Moment in History
 
 
Celebrating Rosalyn Yalow, medical physicist and Nobel laureate
 
Rosalyn Yallow
July 19, 1921 - May 30, 2011

From the age of 8, Rosalyn Yalow knew that she wanted to be a scientist, but she faced discrimination as a Jewish woman breaking into the male-dominated field. Lacking proper funding, she turned a janitor’s closet into a research lab and began working on a new method to measure hormones in the body.

Rosalyn was so confident in her work, she kept champagne chilled in her office in case she ever won the Nobel Prize. Her groundbreaking research was recognised in 1977 when Rosalyn became the second woman ever to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
 
 
Get published in Assembly!
 
  Assembly publishes original work by girls, for girls. And we would love to include your voice! Send us your ideas and you could be featured in the next issue.
 
 
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