A university in Tokyo gives student scientists the opportunity to plan for life on another planet.
 ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 
View in your browser
Assembly

6 June 2019 | Volume 1, Issue 23
  A note from our editor:
In today’s Assembly, 19-year-old Saraí López reveals how universities in Mexico are not keeping their students safe. Citing examples of violence, robbery, sexual harassment and death, she identifies what steps administrators need to take to protect their campuses. This is one article you don’t want to miss.

Also in this issue, we share a new statistic about the economic benefits of educating girls. Students at the Tokyo University of Science tell us about their research that is preparing humans for life in space. And we celebrate Mauritanian singer Dimi Mint Abba, who had the awesome nickname, “the diva of the desert.”

Don’t forget we’re always accepting new pitches! Head to our submission form to tell us your ideas for Assembly.


 
 
Student essay
 
 
 
Universities in Mexico are failing to keep their students safe
Mexican university
  By Saraí López
It is well known that the streets of Mexico are filled with violence, corruption and insecurity. Unfortunately, our schools and universities are going along that line too.

Because corrupt principals and administrative workers steal or divert education funding, some Mexican schools are left without money for technology, infrastructure and even basic services, like running water or toilet paper. Instead of hiring qualified educators, politicians sell teacher positions in public and rural schools. They see schools as a political tool and educating students as an afterthought.

Institutions of higher education are not immune to these problems. On their way to class and on campus, Mexican university students are at risk of violence, robbery, sexual harassment, rape and even death.

I spent a few months studying at a public school before I left because it wasn't meeting my education aspirations. In that short time, I saw firsthand the dangers university students face. Just before I began my degree, students revealed widespread issues of sexual harassment and cover-ups on campus – many other private and public universities in my city then revealed similar situations. When I began my studies, a bus hit my classmate while she was on her way to school. Her unnecessary death occurred because the university didn’t have crossing signals on the road. That same day, a burglar shot and killed another student on her way to class. It was then that I came to the realization that although schools are second homes for many students, they are not places of safety.

One of the most prominent examples of the lack of personal safety for Mexican university students occurred in Guadalajara last year. Three film students — Javier Salomón Aceves Gastélum, Marco García Francisco Ávalos and Jesús Daniel Díaz — were shooting a short film just outside the city. Little did they know, two drug cartels were fighting nearby. One of the cartel leaders assumed the young men were undercover and abducted them. The leaders questioned Javier, Marco and Jesús, and although they insisted they were students, the gang refused to free them. The drug cartel beat and killed the students, and dissolved their bodies in acid.

Read more.
 
 
Did you know? 
Full Force


 
 
 
At Tokyo University of Science, students research how humans can live in space
Tokyo students research
  By Hannah Orenstein
Would a bubble burst in space? “The main reason bubbles break on land is gradient of thickness due to the gravity,” explains Emiko Yoshida, a third-year mechanical engineering student at Tokyo University of Science (TUS). So if there’s no gravity in space, could a bubble last forever?

It might seem like a silly question to ask, but it’s one that the students at TUS’s Space Colony Research Lab are trying to answer. Led by Professor Chiaki Mukai, Japan’s first female astronaut, the lab researches what humans would need to prepare for life in outer space, like how to grow food in a new climate or build housing that can regulate liveable temperatures.

When preparing for life on a new planet, it’s critical to think through every scenario — even the small things we take for granted on Earth could have drastic consequences when you’re light-years away.

High school and university students like Emiko have the opportunity to study at Space Colony Research Lab thanks to the Space Education programme that Professor Mukai helped launch. After making two trips to outer space with JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), Professor Mukai made it her mission to get more women involved in space research.

Read more.
 
 
This Moment in History
 
 
Celebrating Mauritanian singer Dimi Mint Abba
 
Maria
December 25, 1958 — June 4, 2011

Dimi Mint Abba was a popular singer from Mauritania, whose fans affectionately named her “the diva of the desert.” Born to a family of well-known musicians from the iggawen caste (traditional storytellers and artists), she began singing and playing instruments at an early age.

After winning a singing competition as a teenager, Dimi’s popularity grew around Mauritania and the world. Her songs fuse African and Arabic cultures, which contributed to her large fan base in North Africa and the Middle East. She died following an on-stage accident in Morocco.
 
 
Get published in Assembly!
 
  Assembly publishes original work by girls, for girls. And we would love to include your voice! Send us your ideas and you could be featured in the next issue.
 
 
Facebook Twitter Instagram